What Does Robot Recruitment Mean for Job Applicants?

Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 by The Career GuideNo comments

Have you ever been interviewed by a robot? As a leading London recruitment agency, we’re always taking a close look at the latest developments in recruitment—and one of these is robot recruitment. If you’ll be applying for PA jobs over the next few years, chances are that your initial application may well be at the mercy of artificial intelligence (AI), in short, robots.

What is robot recruitment?

There are now a number of companies that are producing job screening software and some big corporations that are getting involved with it. According to science, there may be many hundreds of different markers that can help differentiate candidates for a particular job. Most selection and interview panels, however, are not really equipped to spot these. That’s where AI comes in.

These robots and software programmes can literally handle thousands of decision-making processes in the blink of an eye. One key piece of software gets candidates to answer set questions in front of a camera and monitors their answers, including noting those non-verbal clues. The software then adds all the parameters together and comes up with a score. The key to the success is then comparing this to tests done on current great employees.

There are other parameters that can also be tested at the same time, such as vocal performance. Even the potential for reading “micro expressions” can be included.

What’s the purpose of robot recruitment?

The purpose of this kind of selection process is to greatly reduce the burden on personnel selection, which can often be arbitrary. Let’s say you’re applying for office support jobs. A business could get hundreds of applications and have to quickly and efficiently reduce these down to a manageable number to invite to interviews. One big-name supermarket recently reported that it got around 3 million applications for jobs each year. That’s a lot of candidates to work through and sort out!

Robot intelligence has already been shown to improve the reliability of selection and cut down the workload for large companies. But, if you’re an applicant, how do you improve your chances of passing the AI test?

How do you convince a robot to hire you?

The first thing you need to do is make sure you follow the rules of the selection process closely—and that means reading through the instructions properly. Get it wrong and you could immediately find yourself on the rejection pile!

The increasing prevalence of robotic systems for job selection has naturally led to some concern. Older potential employees have complained that they are being discriminated against, while others are finding ways to game the systems that are currently online. So, another key to success is not thinking about this as a dehumanising process designed to make you feel bad. You need to engage in the way you would at a normal interview and analyse your own performance if you get it wrong, so you can improve next time.

At our London PA and secretarial recruitment agency, we still believe that personal contact is what makes a difference. While robotic selection processes can be good for companies that get large numbers of applications, it doesn’t necessarily achieve the right results when it comes to PA jobs and office support roles. The good news is that if you’re looking for permanent or temporary PA jobs or office support jobs in London, there are still places you can go where human interaction is still appreciated!

 

Love Success is a leading PA and secretarial recruitment agency in London.
Our recruiters can help you find secretarial jobs, office support jobs, and top PA jobs in London.

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